aragorn_reader: (Default)
[personal profile] aragorn_reader
Elrond symbolizes throughout the ancient wisdom, and his House represents Lore--the preservation in reverent memory of all tradition concerning the good, wise, and beautiful. It is not a scene of action but of reflection. Thus it is a place visited on the way to all deeds, or 'adventures.' It may prove to be on the direct road (as in The Hobbit); but it may be necessary to go from there in a totally unexpected course. So necessarily in The Lord of the Rings, having escaped to Elrond from the imminent pursuit of present evil, the hero departs in a wholly new direction: to go and face it at its source.

p. xxvi, Preface, "From a Letter by J. R. R. Tolkien to Milton Waldman, 1951," making his case for why The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings were inseparable and should both be published.

From my $1 trade paperback copy of The Sil bought at the flea market last week (finally making up for the $1 hardbound copy that I passed up years ago because of resentment towards Christopher Tolkien for publishing his father's rough drafts without the latter's consent).

Profile

aragorn_reader: (Default)
aragorn_reader

March 2008

S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 27th, 2017 10:48 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios